Day 3: Sunday, September 5th

The apartment where Jeff and Ana reside has a balcony which overlooks the street they live on - Paseo Ezequiel Gonzalez. I enjoyed standing out on this balcony at all hours watching passersby, the traffic, the view of the Cathedral and Mountains as well as the activity at the shops and restaurants across the street.
One of these shops is "El Acueducto", a bakery. It is directly across from Jeff and Ana's.

While Ani napped and mom made up a batch of baby food, Jeff and I left the apartment, crossed the street and walked into the bakery.

Thanks to Jeff for all the help with the many details and to Betsy for proofing the page.

 

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The reason for our stop was to order some Ponche", also known as Segovia layer cake. It consists of several layers of cake drenched in syrup, with an egg yolk cream between them, and a thick layer of marzipan covering the whole thing.

When planning tonight's dinner Jeff and Ana decided the Ponche would make a nice dessert and so Jeff was here to order some for later pick-up. Now, keep in mind, I had no clue what Jeff was saying to the clerk behind the counter so it was not until later that day I understood the reason for our visit to the bakery.

The pastry in the back right of the case caught my eye because of its different shape. According to Professor Bruner this pastry is know as "Cabelllo de Angel" or "Angel's Hair". It contains a very sweet paste made from squash and sugar.
There are instructions for making this pastry along with photos here.

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While Jeff conversed with the clerk I took a few more snaps. Here, we see one of my favorite pastries - Orejas. Also called "Ears", "Papillons" and "Palm Leaves (Palmiers)". They go by the name "Palmeras" (palm trees) here in Segovia.
I first had these crispy delights in San Francisco. They were from " La Victoria" bakery in the Mission. I also had them from, of all places, a bakery in Nashville called "Aurora". This bakery (now closed), owned by Sri Lankan native Patricia Paiva had excellent ears as well and I found them as good as those made up by La Victoria.
But, the best "Ears" I have had to date came from a Chinese bakery out in the Avenues of San Francisco. The place was called Napoleon Super Bakery in 2007 and on my return for more "Ears" in 2009 I found it renamed to "Cherry Blossom Bakery". Luckily, they still have my orejas.

Now, here is the question - why did I not try some of these Segovian orejas!!?? How and why I managed to walk out of this place without a bag of them, I will never know. I will blame it on still being groggy from jet lag.

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When we departed the bakery we walked up the street and turned left onto Avenue de Fernandez Ladereda.
As we walked down the street towards the Acueducto we passed San Millán Church.

Iglesia San Millán is a fine Romanesque church located outside of the old walls of Segovia. Built between 1111 and 1124, it is one of the oldest churches in the city.

The large church dominates a spacious plaza off of Avenida de Fernandex Ladreda, which leads to the famous aqueduct and passes another Romanesque church, San Clemente.

Patterned closely on the cathedral of Jaca in Aragon, San Millán is especially notable for its pre-Romanesque mozarbic tower and porticoes with abundant Romanesque figurative carvings.

Inside, there are three naves and three apses. The decoration is largely Baroque, but there are some Romanesque frescoes in the chancel.

Source: © 2005-10 Sacred Destinations

I was not able to get inside the ancient church during my visit as it was either not open, or in use anytime we walked by.

We continued our walk down Avenida de Fernandex Ladreda which leads to the Plaza Azoguejo and the world famous Acueducto de Segovia.
At the plaza we made a sharp left up the cobbled and granite block paved streets to the famous restaurant José María. By now we were both ready for a snack so we slipped inside and sat at a corner table in the bar.

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This fella was busily uncorking bottles of wine. Which, I am sure is a daily routine.
Note the hams hanging in the back. You can't get much more Spanish than this.

Spanish dry cured ham

The ubiquitous "Jamón"
From high-end restaurants to local supermarkets.

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Jeff ordered us Spanish tortilla with mackerel and bottled water. These "tortillas" are like an omelet and are made with a wide variety of ingredients.
The bottled water is from right there in Segovia. The Bezoya web site would lead one to believe you are drinking medicine.

Bezoya Natural Mineral Water
By its very low mineralization is water Bezoya best helps you remove impurities from your body and makes you feel lighter, because it is diuretic.

Especially recommended for people with kidney problems and also because of its low sodium content (only 1 mg / l), Bezoya is suitable for those who have to follow a low salt diet and control your blood pressure. Ideal for preparing baby food. The Natural Mineral Water packaging Bezoya - glass bottles, are carefully designed to give an actual self-image.

Source: Bezoya Natural Mineral Water

Thus fortified we headed back to the apartment to pick up Ani and went out for another stroll.

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We made our through the narrow, cobbled streets of Segovia to the Alcázar. Here the Torre de Juan II (Tower of John II) peeks through the branches of the entrance park.

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This monumental Castle, once a primitive Roman military outpost, has been through a number of iterations over the centuries.

The Alcázar of Segovia (literally, Segovia Castle) is a stone fortification, located in the old city of Segovia, Spain. Rising out on a rocky crag above the confluence of the rivers Eresma and Clamores near the Guadarrama mountains, it is one of the most distinctive castle-palaces in Spain by virtue of its shape - like the bow of a ship. The Alcázar was originally built as a fortress but has served as a royal palace, a state prison, a Royal Artillery College and a military academy since then.

The Alcázar of Segovia, like many fortifications in Spain, started off as an Arab fort, but little of that structure remains. The first reference to this particular Alcázar was in 1120, around 32 years after the city of Segovia returned to Christian hands (during the time when Alfonso VI of Castile reconquered lands to the south of the Duero river down to Toledo and beyond). However, archaeological evidence suggests that the site of this Alcázar was once used in Roman times as a fortification. This theory is further substantiated by the presence of Segovia's famous Roman Aqueduct.

Source: WikiPedia

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A closer look at Torre de Juan II.

John II (Juan II) (1405-1454), king of Castile and León (1406-1454), succeeded to the throne when he was only a year old. His regency was well administered under his mother Catherine and his uncle Ferdinand I of Aragón until 1419.
His chief counselor was Don Alvaro de Luna, an accomplished administrator and diplomat who arranged an advantageous second marriage to a Portuguese princess in 1450 when John II's first wife died. John II's new wife resented de Luna's influence and had her husband execute de Luna in 1453. John II is reputed to have died of remorse for this treacherous act.

Source: The University of Calgary

The above info started me thinking. If good old Juan was the king of Castile and León. Then, who was the king of Spain?
I posed this question to Professor Bruner and he got me educated on this little bit of Spanish history.

Let's start with 1492.
The much simplified version of Spanish history says that in that year --in addition to Columbus's voyage-- Spain became a unified country under Isabel of Castilla and Fernando of Aragón.
Before that time, Spain existed as a group of separate kingdoms (principalities, duchies, etc.), which over the years tended to merge into larger units. For example, Castilla started out as a "condado" (county) beside the kingdom of León and eventually grew in power to dominate the area, forming the Kingdom of Castilla y León (a few Leonesesare still angry about this!).

Maps of Castille and Leon

 

The Spanish coat of arms represents this varied history: you see the castle of Castilla, the lion of León, the red and yellow bars of Aragón and the chains of Navarra; at the bottom the pomegranate of Granada (granada = pomegranate) and in the middle are the fleurs-de-lis of the Bourbon dynasty (the family of Juan Carlos I).

Spanish Coat of Arms

Source: Dr. Jeffrey Bruner

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The top of the tower is accessed via 153 steep, narrow and winding steps.

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Later on in the week I would get a chance to see the fab view from the top of the tower.

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Ani enjoys her snack at the entrance to the Alcázar.

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The entrance to the Alcázar has a small park with some monuments. This sign reminds people: "Don't Walk on the Grass".

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I was delighted to see so many urban tree plantings in Madrid, Valladolid, and Segovia. One of the more commonly planted trees is the European Horse Chestnut (Castaño de Indias). The Horse Chestnut is a member of the genus "Aesculus" - for the Ancient Greek playwright, Aeschylus.

The genus Aesculus comprises 13-19 species of woody trees and shrubs native to the temperate northern hemisphere, with 6 species native to North America and 7-13 species native to Eurasia; there are also several hybrids. Species are deciduous or evergreen.

Linnaeus named the genus Aesculus after the Roman name for an edible acorn. The Eurasian species are known as horse chestnuts while the North American species are called buckeyes. Some are also called white chestnut or red chestnut (as in some of the Bach flower remedies). In Britain, they are sometimes called conker trees because of their link with the game of conkers, played with the seeds, also called conkers. Aesculus seeds were traditionally eaten, after leaching, by the Jomon people of Japan over about 4 millenia, until 300AD.

Source: WikiPedia

Horse Chestnuts are different from the "true" Chestnuts which are in the genus Castanea. So it is no surprise the Spanish names are "castaño": chestnut tree and "castaña": chestnut.
The Spanish chestnut (Castanea sativa), or "Sweet Chestnut" is estimated to cover over 300, 000 acres. But, sadly, it has become the victim of the same blight which has all but wiped out the American Chestnut.

The epidemic of chestnut blight or canker (sp. Chancro) ravaging across Spain could eradicate chestnut trees from the Peninsula and southern France in the next 20 years.
Chestnut blight arrived to the Peninsula in 1950 with American chestnuts which were used to replace European trees, themselves decimated by another blight, chestnut ink disease (tinta bel castaño). One solution proposed involves inoculating some 20 chestnuts per hectare with a similar but non-fatal fungus.

Source: IberiaNature: A guide to the natural history of Spain

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This tree, also in the park near the entrance of the Alcázar may be Sycamore Maple (Acer pseudoplatanus). But, I had no way to verify this identification.

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This is one of the statues in the park at the entrance to the Alcázar. Jeff's comment on this photo was "I wonder why this attracted Mike’s attention"?
Hopefully this style of dress will come back into favor at some point in time!

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The Alcázar sits on a promontory at a bend where the Rio Eresma and the Arroyo Clamores meet. This allows a commanding view of the surrounding area including this view of the up-scale San Marcos neighborhood (barrio).

Satellite image of the Alkazar in Segovia Spain

The strategically placed Alcázar as seen via Google Maps.

 

We then departed the Alcázar and walked over to the Museo de Segovia.

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Inside the Museo de Segovia, we studied a model of the local geography (Spain is the 2nd most mountainous country in Europe). The museum has many interesting and beautiful artifacts on display as well as informational videos and dioramas.

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While on the observation patio of the Museo de Segovia Jeff snapped this shot of an American tourist and the Alcázar.

 

Now, it was back to the apartment by a circuitous route of narrow streets and stairways.

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Our route back took us through the Plaza Mayor and past the Segovia Cathedral. This is a shot of the spires on the Cathedral.

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Then we walked down the Calle bel Sol into the old Jewish Quarter.

The remains of the Jewish quarter are located in a well delimited zone of the city that can be easily reached from the Plaza bel Corpus. The Jewish quarter of the city maintains, to a large extent, the same layout as during the Middle Age, though changes made over time have disfigured a part of its original appearance.

In the 15th century, at the time it was established as such, the Jewish quarter had two settlements: in 1412, situated between the Church of San Andrés and San Andrés Gate, and in 1481, also located on the south side of the walled city, in an area between Plaza bel Corpus and the Church of San Andrés. Then the district was enclosed by seven brick arches.

In 1492, after the expulsion, the Jewish quarter was opened once more to the city, and was renamed as Barrionuevo (New district). We may infer that Segovia´s Jewish quarter was always important from the fact that it had five synagogues throughout its history: La Mayor (main one), La Vieja (old one), Nueva Sinagoga Mayor, de Burgos and La Sinagoga bel Campo.

Source: ©Copyright 2001-2006, Network of Spanish Jewish Quarters

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Here we passed by Restaurante El Fogon Sefardi which specializes in Sephardic cuisine.

The cuisine of the Sephardi Jews is an assortment of cooking traditions that developed among the Jews of Spain, Portugal, the Mediterranean, Turkey and Arab countries. Mizrahi and Maghrebi Jews, who are often called Sephardic Jews, are Jews of origins from countries of the Orient and North Africa, respectively. While there is some overlap in populations due to the Sephardic Diaspora, Sephardic Jews settled in many other countries as well, and this article deals only with the populations originating in the Iberian Peninsula.

Source: WikiPedia

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This is the La Plaza de San Martín and a statue of Juan Bravo. These plazas are scattered about all over Segovia. Some are small and open as is La Plaza de San Martín, others are nicely treed with benches and small fountains which at one time served as the source of water for the barrio.

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Juan Bravo (c. 1483, Atienza–24 April 1521, Villalar de los Comuneros) was a leader of the rebel Comuneros in the Castilian War of the Communities.

His father was Gonzalo Ortega Bravo de Laguna, and his mother was María de Mendoza, daughter of the Count of Monteagudo. In 1504 he married Catalina del Río, they went to live in Segovia, and they had a daughter called María de Mendoza.

In 1510 he married a second time, to María Coronel, grand daughter of Abraham Seneor, a converso. They had two sons, Andrea Bravo de Mendoza and Juan Bravo de Mendoza.

He took part in the Castilian War of the Communities, and he was a leader of the rebel army which was defeated at the Battle of Villalar. He was captured, and beheaded the day after the battle.

Source: WikiPedia

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Here we are at the La Casa de los Picos.

I included some info on this interesting structure in my write up for Day 1 of this trip.
As you can see there were quite a few people out on this nice Sunday afternoon.

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The La Casa de los Picos now serves as the "Higher School of Art and Design" as denoted on the door.

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Walking down Calle Real towards the Aqueduct and Plaza.

Calle Real is a pedestrianized street which joins the Plaza bel Azoguejo to the Plaza Mayor - it has lots of interesting monuments:
Palacio de los bel Río (16th century)
Palacio bel Conde de Alpuente (5th century)
Palacio de los Torreagero (15th - 16th century)
Mirador de la Canaleja
Casa de los Picos
Plaza de Juan Bravo

Source: © 2000 Euroresidentes

If you can't find " Calle Real" on the map, here is why.

"Calle Real is the local name for the street. It's officially Calle de Cervantes (until the Casa de los Picos), then Calle de Juan Bravo (until Corpus Christi) and then Calle de Isabel la Catolica. ~ Jeff Bruner

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What better way to spend a warm Sunday afternoon than to enjoy the Plaza bel Azoguejo with the kids...

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... or get a bite to eat at a “terrazas” (café terraces) along Avda Fernández Ladreda.

 

By now, it was indeed time for another bite to eat. So, when Jeff, Ani and I got back to the apartment Ana and Jeff had a pow-wow about lunch. It was decided to get take out. Shortly Jeff and I were back out the door and our way up to barrio San Millán.

At 4 Calle de los Coches we found a take out place called " Reciente".

The sign reads: "Reciente (= recent) Food House- Eat in or take away". It's a bit diner ("home cookin'")-like, Spanish style, and I've never seen any other place like it 'round here.

Source: Jeff Bruner

The place had just opened up and we had the place to ourselves. We placed our orders and soon had our food: Garden salad, macaroni with eggs, roasted chicken with fries and potato salad.

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And, for dessert - the Ponche Segoviano which was ordered at the bakery that morning.

For those who've never heard about it, despite its name it is a cake, not a drink, that consists of several layers of cake drenched in syrup, with an egg yolk cream between them, and with a thick layer of marzipan covering the whole thing... the perfect dessert for Segovia's cold winters.

Source: The Winter Guest

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This is very rich, sweet and filling! I had a small sliver, that was plenty.

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I took this shot from the bacony of Jeff and Ana's place. Jeff described it thus:

A view of the Sierra with cranes (not the flying kind).

Jeff is alluding to the other Cranes which nest in Segovia on the chimney tops and elsewhere. I arrived after they had already migrated. The Common Crane (Grus grus) migrates to north-east Africa, Turkey and the Middle East after staging in Estonia and Hungary.

 

The rest of the afternoon was spent relaxing, napping and also some preparation for the evening meal. Ana was busy with school lesson plans so Jeff got to work on meal prep.

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I have to admit I thought this combination of tuna, egg and tomato sauce looked hideous. But, looks can be deceiving.

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These are the wrappers for the “empanadillas” which will contain the filling Jeff mixed up.
The filling and cooking would be done later after we got back from - yet another stroll around Segovia.

Now, all four of us headed out the door and started up Paseo Ezequiel Gonzalez, past the Avenida de Fernandez which is the main pedestrian street to the Aqueduct from the south side of Segovia. As we walked along Paseo Ezequiel Gonzalez we also went past the Jardinillos (gardens) de San Roque and the flower beds by the Iglesia (church) de Santo Tomás.

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Impatiens are one of my favorite flowers. I grew them in my Japanese Garden in San Francisco when I was a teenager. I still grow them.

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Here is an example of what "grab shot" looks like: uncontrolled depth of field which caused part of the photo to be out of focus. Had I set the camera to "Infinity" focus, this would not have happened.

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This was embedded in the sidewalk. Jeff explains:

The scallop symbol of Santiago (St. James)—patron saint of Spain; Segovia is on one of the routes of the Camino de Santiago (St. James’ Way)

WikiPedia tells us more:

The Way of St James has existed for over a thousand years. It was one of the most important Christian pilgrimages during medieval times, together with Rome and Jerusalem, and a pilgrimage route on which a plenary indulgence could be earned; other major pilgrimage routes include the Via Francigena to Rome and the pilgrimage to Jerusalem.

Source: WikiPedia

Way of St. James (route descriptions) at WikiPedia

That's a lot of walkin'!

We were now in new territory for me. And, typically, the street name had now changed. What was Paseo Ezequiel Gonzalez was now Paseo bel Conde de Sepulveda. We turned left onto Calle de Jose Zorilla and were soon at the site of a special event.

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The happy family in front of the Iglesia bel Santo Cristo bel Mercado, where Jeff and Ana were married and Ani was baptized.
There is a Google maps view here.

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Professor Bruner translated the stone marker text:

"On the 3rd of May 1411 St. Vicente Ferrer preached at this location and the people built this chapel to the Holy Christ of the cattle market of the city of Segovia"

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A short distance beyond Iglesia bel Santo Cristo bel Mercado to the south east is the Puerta de Madrid so named because the road leads to Madrid.

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The Puerta de Madrid, one of the principal entrances to the city.

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Detail of the The Puerta de Madrid.

We continued on past the Puerta de Madrid and once past it the street name changed to Carretera de San Rafael. Here we walked by the local headquarters (Cuartel) of the Commandancia Guardia Civil - subsector de traffico.

 

We then strolled through the triangular section of the Parque de la Dehesa which is sandwiched between Carretera de San Rafael and Avenue de la Constitucion. The park land ceded to Segovia in the 15th century by King Henry IV of Castille.

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While walking through the park we came across this interesting stone structure. Jeff thought it might be a wash house or used for equipment and tool storage.

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On the right side of the doorway is a stone plaque.

"The Chata's Hut / "The Book of Good Love" / Year 1380 / Verses 950-1042". I read somewhere that this structure is an artist's rendition of the hut the author of "The Book of Good Love" (it's a long poem) described, which was supposedly located in the sierra. ~Jeff

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A quick snapshot of one of many nicely ornamented water fountains I saw throughout Segovia.

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Jeff says:

An area for traditional sports/games in the Parque de la Dehesa: these courts are used for “petanca” (similar to “Bocce”).

There is more info here.

 

After passing the Artillery Station on Avenue Juan Carlos I, we then walked up Avenue bel Padre Claret where we passed an old monastery which has now been converted to "Hotel San Antonio el Real’s Claustro Restaurant".
We then came to the intersection of Calle de Mon Almira and Calle bel and Coronel Ramon Rexach. It is here the Aqueduct ends and nearly reaches street level.

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The towering 93' height of the Aqueduct of Segovia as experienced from the Plaza bel Azoguejo is reduced here to more human proportions.

Although the date of construction cannot be definitively determined, researchers have placed it between the second half of the 1st Century AD and the early years of the 2nd Century. Any structure that old is going to get a little rough around the edges over the centuries. So, there have been several restoration efforts to maintain it's strength and beauty.

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“Aqueduct channel restored by volunteers in Segovia, June 2001”

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Looking down the water channel towards the "Casa de Aguas (or Waterhouse)".

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A partial view of the waterhouse can be see at the end of the channel. This view is looking towards the Plaza bel Azoguejo.

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I climbed up on Aqueduct to get this shot looking down the channel in the direction of the original source of the water - a small river in the Sierra de Guadarrama.

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The sedimentation or water house where the water from the mountain source is “purified” before continuing into the old city.
It is here the water was decanted so sand and other fines could settle out before being transported to the city proper.

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I was able to get my arm squeezed between the bars to get this interior shot of the waterhouse.

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This photo, taken from where the channel enters the waterhouse, looks back toward the intersections of Calle de Mon Almira and Calle bel and Coronel Ramon Rexach where the Aqueduct terminates.

The aqueduct transports waters from Fuente Fría river, situated in the nearby mountains, some 17 kilometers (10.6 miles) from the city in a region known as La Acebeda. It runs another 15 kilometers (9.3 miles) before arriving in the city. The water is first gathered in a tank known as El Caserón (or Big House), and is then led through a channel to a second tower known as the Casa de Aguas (or Waterhouse).

There it is naturally decanted and sand settles out before the water continues its route. Next the water travels 728 meters (0.45 miles) on a one-percent grade until it is high upon the Postigo, a rocky outcropping on which the old city center, the Segovia Alcázar, was built.

Then, at Plaza de Díaz Sanz (Díaz Sanz Square), the structure makes an abrupt turn and heads toward Plaza Azoguejo (Azoguejo Square). It is there the monument begins to display its full splendor. At its tallest, the aqueduct reaches a height of 28.5 meters (93.5 ft), including nearly 6 meters (19.7 ft) of foundation.

There are both single and double arches supported by pillars. From the point the aqueduct enters the city until it reaches Plaza de Díaz Sanz, it boasts 75 single arches and 44 double arches (or 88 arches when counted individually), followed by four single arches, totalling 167 arches in all.

The construction of the aqueduct follows the principles laid out by Vitruvius as he describes in his De Architectura published in the mid-first century.

Source: WikiPedia

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Here, the foundation and arches are already starting to get massive.

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Some of the first arches; Ani wants to be sure everyone knows that she’s 1 year old.

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I wasn't the only one with a camera.

Ana and Ani at the Aqueduct of Segovia

Nice shot, Jeff!

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Photo op for the Bruner Regidor family.

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This is first set of arches heading into the old city.

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Detail of the keystone in one of the 166 arches and 120 pillars arranged in two levels.

The first section of the aqueduct contains 36 semi-circular arches, rebuilt in the 15th century to restore a portion destroyed by the Moors in 1072. The line of arches is organized in two levels, decorated simply, in which predominantly simple moulds hold the frame and provide support to the structure.

On the upper level, the arches have a total width of 5.1 meters (16.1 ft). Built in two levels, the top pillars are both shorter and narrower than those on the lower level. The top of the structure contains the channel through which water travels, through a U-shaped hollow measuring 0.55 by 0.46 meters (1.8 by 1.5 feet). The channel continuously adjusts to the base height and the topography below.

The lower-level arches have an approximate width of 4.5 meters (14.8 ft); Their pillars gradually increase in circumference size. The top of each pillar has a cross-section measuring 1.8 by 2.5 meters (5.9 by 8.2 feet), while the base cross-section measures approximately 2.4 by 3 meters (7.9 by 9.8 feet).

Source: WikiPedia

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Here one starts to gets a hint of how the arches will soar higher and higher.
But, how do you lift the thousands of heavy stones into place?

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See the divots in the stones? The Romans used what were basically giant ice tongs or calipers to lift and jockey the stones into place. And, of course it helps when you have an endless supply of slaves.

Those Romans were ingenious bastards. ~Jeff

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The Aqueduct was starting to glow in the late evening sun.

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More solid construction, but all structures need some up-keep (“Restored in MDCCCLVVIII = 1768) ~ Jeff

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These bollards prevent "cut-throughs" between the arches.

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Both tourists and locals were out enjoying the grandeur of the Aqueduct as well as the fine, late summer weather.

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Note the slope of the street. The Roman engineers had no problems with this!

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Here, the Aqueduct is approaching 30'in height and stones are really getting massive.

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Here, Where the Aqueduct makes a turn, the first of the second set of arches can be seen.

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Jeff and Ani are dwarfed by the stonework at the corner.

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Looking down toward the plaza thorough the last single arch section where the Aqueduct makes the turn.

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Another photo op under the arches; considering that Jeff is 5’9”, you can get an idea of the height of the aqueduct here.

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Where the Aqueduct makes the turn there was a small plaza and another fountain.

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This view of the turn clearly shows the beginning of the second set of arches.

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Looking down toward the Plaza bel Azoguejo. Segovians don't miss any chance to sit outside and enjoy a bite to eat or perhaps a cañas of cerveza.

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Even with today's modern machinery it would be quite a feat to build such an amazing structure.

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When almost to the Plaza Jeff and Ana met some acquaintances and we stopped for a bit to chat.

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"High Five!" knows no boundaries.

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Ani likes to chat.

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Looking back up towards the bend in the Aqueduct.

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The “center” of the aqueduct with the figure Saint Barbara (patron saint of the artillery); here you can see the holes in the stone where the Romans had placed an inscription. ~Jeff

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By now it is probably 9:00 pm - still early for Segovians and Avda Fernández Ladreda is busy with both locals and tourists eating, drinking, strolling and chatting.

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A look back at the Aqueduct now at it's 93' height.

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All that walkin' and gawkin' required refueling. So a quick snack of pincho, chips and cañas was in order.
Thus sated we strolled the last few blocks back to the apartment for something a bit more substantial.

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Using the previously mixed filling of combination of tuna, egg and tomato sauce, Jeff fills the empanadilla wrappers.
Empanadillas are the smaller, pocket-size versions of empanadas, and are sometimes served as tapas.

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An empanada is a stuffed bread or pastry baked or fried in many countries of Latin America and the south of Europe. The name comes from the verb empanar, meaning to wrap or coat in bread. Empanada is made by folding a dough or bread patty around the stuffing. The stuffing can consist of a variety of meats, vegetables, or even fruits.

Empanadas trace their origins to Galicia, Spain and Portugal. They first appeared in medieval Iberia during the time of the Moorish invasions. A cookbook published in Catalan in 1520, the Libre del Coch by Ruperto de Nola, mentions empanadas filled with seafood among its recipes of Catalan, Italian, French, and Arabian food. In turn, it is believed that empanadas and the similar calzones are both derived from the Arabic meat-filled pies, samosa.

Source: WikiPedia

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Don't they look yummy!!??

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Dinner is served!

 

Muchas gracias to Jeff, Ana and Ani for another great day in Segovia.

 

There is a crude Google map of the Sunday Evening Stroll Route here.

 

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